Dating vintage sewing

This article is your go-to reference for tips and tricks to reveal a garment’s probable vintage era based on the details of its labels and tags alone! Approximately the year noted on the tag, or a few years later. A.” or the design of an American flag on or near the garment’s brand tag. WHY IT’S VINTAGE: While statistically speaking I don’t have the numbers to back it up, we can all agree that only a small percent of garments today are actually Made in U. Clearly, “De Pinna” wasn’t aware of theirs when they made this garment before 1963! Pre-1939 if the made-from-wool garment has no label identifying it as wool. WHY IT’S VINTAGE: According to one of my sources, half sizes were introduced in 1940s sewing patterns for “shorter” women.

I’d love to know, so please leave me a comment below the post or by saying hello on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram or by subscribing to my newsletter (which emails content not on the site — including behind-the-scenes of thrift stores and vintage photoshoot pics! NOTE: The catch to consider is that the copyright date isn’t always the production year of the garment itself, but rather the date the brand or logo was copyrighted. The verbiage should be up front and not behind the tag. The garment isn’t older than 1964 if it has the first Woolmark logo (100% wool); no older than 1971 if it has the second (60% wool) and no older than 1999 if it has the third (50% wool). The half size denoted the garment’s shorter length.

) Feel free to scroll through the post to read these 13 tips for using your garment’s tag to help identify its vintage era, or click any of the links below to be taken immediately to the text within the article! WHY IT’S VINTAGE: If you’ve got a garment with a copyright year of 1992 or earlier, then by industry definition you’ve got yourself a huge piece of the puzzle dating your garment as vintage! WHY IT’S VINTAGE: The Woolmark logo was first placed on the tags of wool clothing in 1964 as a marketing technique to encourage consumers to buy the natural fiber of wool over synthetics polyester and acrylic. Pre-1999, considering the British Colony of Hong Kong gained its independence before the dawn of the new millennium. the use of “half” sizes with 1/2 after the whole number size, i.e. The sizing was with an even whole number and “1/2” because odd numbers were denoted for junior sizing (at that time, petite women and not teenagers).

NOTE: Because the Woolmark logo is licensed and therefore costs money to use, not all garments made from wool are labeled with a Woolmark. WHY IT’S VINTAGE: While dating a garment to 1999 doesn’t make it vintage, you can date garments with countries like “Yugoslavia,” which divided into Bosnia, Croatia, Macedonia, Serbia and Montenegro, and Slovenia in the early 1990s. My other source references half sizes as indicators of a vintage plus-size garment beginning at size 20 1/2.

It has been found that if the parts are inclined less; than about eight degrees from vertical, a clear stitching point is not obtained.

It was patented to Singer Manufacturing Company on 5 February 1946. you never saw production flow more smoothly when complex precision parts are made by one company, finished and assembled by another. (Made of die-cast aluminum for light weight and sturdiness) In the photo above the two major Doehler-Jarvis die castings that frame "Singer's new Model 301" have been assembled, then sliced down the middle to show the (Tripod-Control) method.

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Over a year ago I shared my “11 Ways to Tell It’s Vintage by Labels & Tags.” The story was such a hit that it inspired me to write stories on how union labels and the construction of your vintage garment can help when determining a garment’s era and fashion history. Secondly, the production country of a modern garment is typically found the tag — not frontside, as seen here on this 1980s Jeanne Marc label. a boutique’s address with the absence of a zip code. Today, (Manhattan) New York has more than 40 different zip codes. either the absence of, or the design of a “Woolmark.” HOW OLD?There was a very desperate need for change with not only the family sewing machine but also for educators and high school home economic classes.Fortunately, Singer was already planning for their 100th year anniversary with a new sewing machine that was a dramatic departure from the straight stitch machines of that day.(He also got married in the same year.) He became very well known by many people as a very diligent person and committed to excellent service.In 1970 he went to Germany to study the new Singer 700 edition – the first machine that could wind the thread on the bobbin automatically, without removing the bobbin from the bobbin case.